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New Log Cabin Quilt



 
 
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  #51  
Old February 22nd 07, 08:30 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Patti
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Posts: 5,076
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

Yes Edward - but one of my college subjects was advanced Latin gg

Deduce what you wish ...!
..
In message , Edward W.
Thompson writes
snip

This is an interesting subject albeit OT. However, how do you address
the differences with pronunciation between regions? Who determines
what is correct and incorrect? How do you account for the very
significant differences or, more correctly, changes in the meaning of
words, take 'gay' for example or 'cool'.

The big strength of the English language and no doubt other languages
is they change through common usage to reflect the needs of the users
and pressures of the time. While I agree with everyone on the
irritation of mispronunciation, bad grammar, mangled use of words, I'm
afraid this is the result of working in a 'living' and 'dynamic'
language.


--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
Ads
  #52  
Old February 22nd 07, 08:48 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Kate XXXXXX Kate XXXXXX is offline
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First recorded activity by CraftBanter: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,708
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

WitchyStitcher wrote:
It's the pronunciations that get to me. I have been stressing to my
students that if they pronounce words correctly, they will be more
likely to spell them correctly.

Then I walked into a 5th grade classroom where the teacher had written
the date as Valentines Day, Febuary 14, 2007.


ARGH!!!

My nit-pick of the moment is There's/Theirs and there/their/they're.

Oh, and spelling and grammar checking on the computer that tells me I
have it wrong when I write a sentence of 40+ words with three sets of
parentheses...

Then there's the split infinitive no man has splat before.

--
Kate XXXXXX R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.katedicey.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #53  
Old February 22nd 07, 08:53 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Hanne Gottliebsen
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 336
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

Megan Zurawicz wrote:

Incorrect usage of terminology:
examples: misuse of "speaker implies/hearer infers", "very unique" (unique =
"one of a kind"---how can something be "very one of a kind"?), "begging the
question" being used to mean "leads us to ask" rather than "trying to use
what you're trying to prove as proof of itself", etc.


"begs the questions": I have only _ever_ heard it used in as "leads us
to ask".

Of course, I do proofs for a living, and end up using phrases like
"circular reasoning" even with friends/family not from work, who may not
be entirely sure what I mean by that...

Hanne in London - intrigued

  #54  
Old February 22nd 07, 09:12 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Kate XXXXXX Kate XXXXXX is offline
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Posts: 1,708
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

TerriLee in WA (state) wrote:
Oh, good grief!! As the daughter of an English major, all the things
mentioned annoy me. My mom use to tell me the very same thing; pronounce it
correctly, and spelling becomes much easier. Her other favorite remark was
"Words have meanings!" She said this when people used a word in the wrong
context, or used it to mean something it was never intended to mean.


I taught English up to university entrance level on and off for many
years. I am dyslexic. The spelling checker is a wonderful tool, but it
does annoy me that these days so many kids use it without checking to
ensure that it is both set to the correct version of the language for
the area and exam system in which they live and work, and that they
accept it's corrections without checking that it has given them the
correct word, or the correct version of the word chosen.

For people like me who have no problem with pronunciation (I was brought
up in an RAF environment, mostly in England, by Scots parents, and my
'accent' is close to BBC/received pronunciation, with odd pockets of
Scots here and there), spelling can still be challenging, and genuine
errors hold no fears for me. There is, however, no acceptable reason an
no excuse for sending out official documents with spelling or
grammatical errors, and I too get out the red pen and send them back for
correction.

I am a very firm believer in the organic nature of language, and have no
trouble with words being hijacked, altered, changing their use over
time, and with grammar changing and adapting to suit new circumstances.
However, I am firmly against spelling reformation: that way you lose
the roots of the language, the context of the vocabulary, the ability to
map the changes, and, ultimately, the meaning. English as we speak it
today is a complex collection and amalgamation of languages: the
vocabulary and grammar have been absorbed from many root languages, and
there are more shades of meaning in it than in almost any other. We
need to continue this growth and change, not stifle it. But we also
need to accept and acknowledge those roots and the conventions of
grammar and spelling that go with them if we are to make any sense to
ourselves and those around us. Let me recommend Eats, Shoots & Leaves:
The Zero Tolerance Approach to Punctuation by Lynne Truss (Paperback -
31 Oct 2005)
and Talk to the Hand: The Utter Bloody Rudeness of Everyday Life (or Six
Good Reasons to Stay Home and Bolt the Door) by Lynne Truss (Hardcover
- 31 Oct 2005)

And always remember: spelling and grammar 'rools' are more a set of
guidelines and convention than laws! They are optional: fabric isn't!

--
Kate XXXXXX R.C.T.Q Madame Chef des Trolls
Lady Catherine, Wardrobe Mistress of the Chocolate Buttons
http://www.katedicey.co.uk
Click on Kate's Pages and explore!
  #55  
Old February 22nd 07, 11:21 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Roberta Zollner
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,988
Default New Log Cabin Quilt

One of my favorites. And the added introduction in the American edition is a
bonus!
Roberta in D

"Patti" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
I have it, too!
It was a revelation to the 12 year-old I was tutoring for two years - to
realise that punctuation was not a torture invented by teachers, but a
functional and vital part of the English language g
.
In message om, John
writes
I love her! I received a copy of "Shoots, Eats, and Leaves"
for Christmas and have been wholeheartedly enjoying reading
it!

-- Anita --


I gave that book to her for her birthday. So much for sentimentality.
She loved it by the way.

John


--
Best Regards
pat on the hill



  #56  
Old February 22nd 07, 01:56 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
witchystitcher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 167
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

I teach a developmental reading class where phonemic awareness and
phonics is stressed. These are children who are 9-11 years old and
reading 2 or more years below grade level despite average or above
average intelligence.

I explain to them how the English language has changed and where words
come from. I teach them about our Lawn Guyland accent and how it
affects words. They have great fun doing exaggerations of this but it
does focus their attentions on the words. This helps them understand
word meanings and word spellings.



On Thu, 22 Feb 2007 06:32:57 +0000, Edward W. Thompson
wrote:

This is an interesting subject albeit OT. However, how do you address
the differences with pronunciation between regions? Who determines
what is correct and incorrect?

Linda
PATCHogue, NY
  #57  
Old February 22nd 07, 02:10 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
witchystitcher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 167
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

My papers dun as ewe kin sea
Its jest as grate as it kin bee
This I know bee cause
I have a spell Czech on my pea sea

Eye strike a key and type a word
And weight fore it too say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me write a weigh.

Sew Teacher eye now no
Cuz my chequer tolled me sew
This papers perfect all the weigh
Throw aweigh that read pen and
Jest mark this with an aye.



On Thu, 22 Feb 2007 09:12:28 +0000, Kate XXXXXX
wrote:

I taught English up to university entrance level on and off for many
years. I am dyslexic. The spelling checker is a wonderful tool, but it
does annoy me that these days so many kids use it without checking to
ensure that it is both set to the correct version of the language for
the area and exam system in which they live and work, and that they
accept it's corrections without checking that it has given them the
correct word, or the correct version of the word chosen.

Linda
PATCHogue, NY
  #58  
Old February 22nd 07, 05:19 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Sandy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,948
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

In article ,
"CATS" wrote:

Such errors in a training manual are inexcusable!

I am slipping into the habit of using internet
abbreviations/grammar/punctuation in emails and posts, but I
would never mail a letter that was not thoroughly checked.
The same applies to the notes I print out for my classes. I
will not pass out notes that have spelling/grammar errors.
And it annoys me that my failing eyesight means that I might
miss spelling errors more often now. (Don't anyone mention
spellcheck - we use English spelling here, remember
lol)

But what excuse do Govt Departments have to allow such poor
standards of correspondence on their letterheads?

The attitude now is "if it gets the message across, what
difference does it make?", but I recently wrote a tender for
a friend who is definitely challenged in the writing skills
area. When he was advised that he had won the tender he was
told that his was not the best bid, but that he had
submitted the most professional paperwork and was therefore
seen as the best tenderer. So at least some out there still
look for standards in writing and communication.

--

Cheryl & the Cats in OZ
o o o o
( Y ) ( Y )
Boofhead Donut
http://community.webshots.com/user/witchofthewest
catsatararatATyahooDOTcomDOTau



I agree wholeheartedly with you, Cheryl. DH isn't the best in spelling
and grammar, so he *always* has me proof what he's sending out to his
students. When he was a high school principal, he did the same; his
secretary couldn't be trusted to correct things, as she was almost as
bad at spelling as he is and didn't care. :S

It used to embarrass me no end that letters from the district office
went out to parents with glaring mistakes in them. It infuriates me that
government sends out similar paperwork. I've even been tempted to write
to our local television and radio stations to ask if they have anyone on
staff to proofread newscasts and check pronunciation before someone goes
on the air and messes up.

It's just awful! My current pet peeve is the difference in its/it's and
similar words with and without apostrophes. I can't figure out why
people can't see that an apostrophe on a pronoun means that a letter is
missing. Therefore, "it's" really means "it is", not that something
belongs to "it". :S There is no such thing as "her's" or "their's".
Sheesh.
--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sfoster 1 (at) earthlink (dot) net (remove/change the obvious)
http://home.earthlink.net/~sfoster1
  #59  
Old February 22nd 07, 06:41 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Sunny
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 478
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

Go, Pig! In my former life as a responsible, earning adult, I was a
writer. I was a newspaper writer/reporter for my entire career.
Newspapers often opt for "calarity over grammar" -- as if the two
were mutually exclusive. Drove me nuts. Even though I always intended
to be a reporter, my degree was in English Literature. My husband is
now City Editor of our local newspaper. He and I have had some snippy
discussions through our years together about language. His position is
that language and spelling are evolving, as they always have, and that
staid, stuffy traditionalists had better just give it up. My position
is that there is correct and there is incorrect and that people who
want to make their words public should first make certain that those
words are correct. I grit my teeth all the time when reading
everything from major daily newspapers to blogs. OMG people! Get a
tiny little copy of Strunk and White and learn to write the English
language.

(I am not talking about folks, like all of us here, who "talk" on
posting boards. I really don't get too worked up about grammar or
spelling or such when we are having what amounts to a friendly and
very casual conversation. Nobody here is intending to publish their
words and immortalize their posts, so please don't be offended by my
little rant here.)

Enough ranting. You get the picture. I fervantly wish that people who
write for public consumption would consult the necessary books/
websites/English teachers and write with precision and conformity to
standard English. And yes, I AM one of "those people".

Sunny
who grew up in rural, hicksville Texas saying such things as "nukuler
mirs" and "liberry" and "it's down around the co'ner", and if I can
learn and change, anybody can



  #60  
Old February 22nd 07, 06:52 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Sunny
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 478
Default OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)

No Edward, what we are talking about is not the result of evolving
language. We are talking about the mangling of standard usage --
grammar and spelling -- by people who should know better or who should
employ a proofreader.

As for geographic differences in pronunciation: I find most local
dialects to be lovely to hear. The spoken language has great poetry in
it. But when one goes on the air as a professional, either a news
person or a spokesperson for an important organization/agency, that
person has a responsibility to speak properly. It's fine and dandy to
have an accent, but accents seldom account for the truly ignorant
pronunciations that one hears coming from public servants who should
know better.

As for OT -- I think this discussion is completely on topic. We are
quilters and we spend a lot of time making certain colors work
together, points match, lines are straight.....how can we not carry
that precision and care over to language? I really believe that there
is a similarity between quilting and writing. I think that's why this
"caught" me when I lost my ability to write for a living. This
discussion isn't just about words. It's about who we are as quilters.
We are people of precision and care. We are really discussing the
things that make us good quilters. Our eyes, ears, senses and internal
"gyroscope" if you will. I find this topic totally on topic.



Sunny

On Feb 21, 10:32 pm, Edward W. Thompson
wrote:
On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 18:43:18 -0500, WitchyStitcher
wrote:

It's the pronunciations that get to me. I have been stressing to my
students that if they pronounce words correctly, they will be more
likely to spell them correctly.


Then I walked into a 5th grade classroom where the teacher had written
the date as Valentines Day, Febuary 14, 2007.


snip

This is an interesting subject albeit OT. However, how do you address
the differences with pronunciation between regions? Who determines
what is correct and incorrect? How do you account for the very
significant differences or, more correctly, changes in the meaning of
words, take 'gay' for example or 'cool'.

The big strength of the English language and no doubt other languages
is they change through common usage to reflect the needs of the users
and pressures of the time. While I agree with everyone on the
irritation of mispronunciation, bad grammar, mangled use of words, I'm
afraid this is the result of working in a 'living' and 'dynamic'
language.



 




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