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OT word of the day



 
 
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  #231  
Old April 29th 09, 04:34 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
NightMist
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Posts: 1,734
Default OT word of the day


Shoulder Pads

Contrary to popular opinion, the object of shoulder pads is not to
make you look like a football player.
They actually have many purposes, to provide a smooth and even
foundation for the garment to hang from if you have bumpy bony
shoulders, to compensate for uneven shoulders, to camouflage sloping
shoulders, to generally shape the shoulder area so a specific style of
sleeve hangs properly, all in addition to their purpose of modifying
the silhouette (giving you linebacker shoulders).

There are two basic types of shoulder pads, round and square. The
round ones slope gently at the outside edge, while the square ones end
sharply. They vary in size and thickness as appropriate to the
garment and the current fashion. They by no means have to be an inch
thick and made of foam rubber. I use them in almost every jacket or
coat that I make just to provide a bit of support at the shoulder
seams for both drape and seam, and often I make them no more than a
few layers of fabric thick.

--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.
Ads
  #232  
Old April 29th 09, 09:23 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Patti
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Posts: 5,076
Default OT word of the day

How true this all is. I had a coat made for me recently. I gave the
lady some 'gentle' shoulder pads, with the fabric. She didn't put them
in. I have worn the coat a few times, but I'm going to have to unpick
the lining a bit and put some in - it doesn't look or feel right.
..
In message , NightMist
writes

Shoulder Pads

Contrary to popular opinion, the object of shoulder pads is not to
make you look like a football player.
They actually have many purposes, to provide a smooth and even
foundation for the garment to hang from if you have bumpy bony
shoulders, to compensate for uneven shoulders, to camouflage sloping
shoulders, to generally shape the shoulder area so a specific style of
sleeve hangs properly, all in addition to their purpose of modifying
the silhouette (giving you linebacker shoulders).

There are two basic types of shoulder pads, round and square. The
round ones slope gently at the outside edge, while the square ones end
sharply. They vary in size and thickness as appropriate to the
garment and the current fashion. They by no means have to be an inch
thick and made of foam rubber. I use them in almost every jacket or
coat that I make just to provide a bit of support at the shoulder
seams for both drape and seam, and often I make them no more than a
few layers of fabric thick.


--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
  #233  
Old April 30th 09, 01:49 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Maureen Wozniak
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Posts: 1,090
Default OT word of the day

On Thu, 23 Apr 2009 22:48:55 -0500, NightMist wrote
(in article ):

Turkey Work
Smyrna Stitch

I hold turkey work to be a distinct thing on it's own and entirely
seperate from candlewicking, though the two may be combined in a
single piece.
I am saying this straight out because I know a good many people use
the two terms interchangeably. I have also seen redwork called turkey
work, my best guess there is that the color has something to do with
the mislabling.

Turkey work is a needlecraft that gives a piled, or even fuzzy effect.
It has been used for any number of things over the years from rugs to
bedspreads to upholstry to toys and so on.
It has been around since at least the seventeenth century, and has had
periodic fads over the centuries.
While some of the original turkish stitches involved useing a cluster
of threads to make individual tufts on the surface of the fabric,
modern turkey work is primarily makeing loops and cutting them to
create the piled effect. It can be worked on almost any fabric with a
distinct weave, and with nearly any decorative thread. It is most
commonly done at this point in history by needlepointers, so the
majority of readily available instructions call for needlepoint canvas
and wool. I have used it on cushion covers with common embroidery
thread and pearl cotton, and found it easy enough to do on embroidery
linen or canvas duck.
When done with wool or knitting yarns it is often brushed to make it
fuzzy, a nice effect for animal fur or teddy bears and what have you.

Here is a picture of a simple bit. The squirrels tail was made in
this stitch, obviously cutting the loops to leave the threads rather
longish:

http://home-and-garden.webshots.com/...34088454pyGQat

Here are two different sets of instructions for doing this stitch, one
standard, one modified:

http://www.heritageshoppe.com/herita...es/turkey.html
http://www.needlepoint.org/StitchOfT...h/2006/aug.php


Wow Nightmist.

I don't know where you find all this information. But it's fascinating!

I love the Word of the Day.

Maureen

  #234  
Old May 5th 09, 02:36 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
NightMist
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Posts: 1,734
Default OT word of the day

Buttonhole stitch
Blanket stitch

Different stitches with similar and sometimes interchangeable
purposes.
The names of these stitches are often confused.
Both are used for binding raw edges, lace making, embroidery, and
buttonholes.
There are strong similarities in appearance between the two stitches,
and both have countless variations upon them. However upon closer
examination they are clearly different stitches, and are made very
differently.

Instructions for making both stitches, with some variations on the
blanket stitch are he

http://www.heritageshoppe.com/herita...ketstitch.html

--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.
  #235  
Old May 5th 09, 08:22 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
Patti
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 5,076
Default OT word of the day

Well, I never knew the 'groups of three' aspect of blanket stitch. I
just thought blanket stitch had wider gaps between the 'legs'.

Thanks for this extra snippet of knowledge Nightmist.
..
In message , NightMist
writes
Buttonhole stitch
Blanket stitch

Different stitches with similar and sometimes interchangeable
purposes.
The names of these stitches are often confused.
Both are used for binding raw edges, lace making, embroidery, and
buttonholes.
There are strong similarities in appearance between the two stitches,
and both have countless variations upon them. However upon closer
examination they are clearly different stitches, and are made very
differently.

Instructions for making both stitches, with some variations on the
blanket stitch are he

http://www.heritageshoppe.com/herita...ketstitch.html


--
Best Regards
pat on the hill
  #236  
Old May 6th 09, 02:45 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
NightMist
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Posts: 1,734
Default OT word of the day


Jersey

A single knit cotton or cotton blend fabric, usually sold by the yard
in tubes. It has a substantial crosswise stretch and much more
limited lengthwise stretch.
The original fabric from the isle of Jersey was wool, and sometimes
lightly napped on the purl side.
Heavier doubleknit jersey is available, though it has less stretch.

It is the fabric that isused to make T-shirts not the fabric used to
make sport jerseys, at least in the US.
--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.
  #237  
Old May 7th 09, 12:02 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
NightMist
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Posts: 1,734
Default OT word of the day

matelassage

Originally a variety of wholecloth quilting from Marseilles, the word
has come to simply mean quilting in the modern sense that we are all
familiar with. Pieced, applique, or wholecloth, this is the word most
commonly used in french for making quilts.
In the original work in France the top may have been a print,
embroidered, or plain, most commonly in linen or cotton though silk
was also much in use. The batting was usually of carded cotton or
silk. For a while quilts of this variety were a much in demand trade
good.
--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.
  #238  
Old May 8th 09, 08:36 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
NightMist
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Posts: 1,734
Default OT word of the day


Hollow fiber

While they are used a lot in things like filtration systems and other
industrial applications requireing a floating membrane, hollow fibers
are also used in textiles.

As a stand alone term, hollow fiber usually refers to a manmade fiber
that has been spun around a solid core of something like vinyl, the
core is then slid out of the resultant yarn leaving the hollow shell.
This yarn is an excellent insulator, but has very poor tensile
strength. It is used in several brand name thermal products, where it
is used as a fill or batt. Several companies are experimenting with
blending various types of hollow fiber with other fibers in order to
produce a textile retaining the excellent insulating properties of
hollow fibers, and with sufficient strength to be used as a functional
fabric.

--

Nothing has been the same since that house fell on my sister.
  #239  
Old May 14th 09, 03:19 PM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
NightMist
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Posts: 1,734
Default OT word of the day

I will be back to doing this sometime after I get back from the
wedding.
I was just going to take a day off to put the finishing touches on my
dress, and then _everything_ went wrong.

NightMist
thinking of writing a book called "When Good Sewing Machines Go Bad"
--

Legolas is my house elf
  #240  
Old May 31st 09, 04:30 AM posted to rec.crafts.textiles.quilting
NightMist
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Posts: 1,734
Default OT word of the day

Block Printing

Block printing is the earliest printing technique known of imparting
printed design to textiles, in fact the use of block printing on
textiles may well predate its use on paper. Sources vary as to whether
China or Egypt was the first civilization to play with the method.

In its earliest forms, pieces of wood were carved with the desired
design, then dye was bushed on the blocks and stamped on the fabric.
As the art evolved more interesting methods were tried, some
successfully, some less so. Since vegetables dyes were the ones
primarily is use, a lot of experimenting to get various colors on a
single piece with a colored background took place. Some interesting
results were achieved by stamping just the mordants, and then brush or
tub dyeing.
Of course stamping resists was not far behind stamping dyes in being
thought of, and discharge methods came along after a while as well.

Through history blocks for printing have been made of a wide variety
of materials and combinations of materials. Wood is not as common
now, assorted metals, silicones, rubber, linoleum (like back in school
art class), and various such things have been used and are still used
today.

In the west block printing has largely been discarded in comercial
application, but in the east it is still much in use as so much more
industry there is home based.
The recent rubber stamp craze in the west extended into clothing and
textiles with designs being stamped on all sorts of things in fabric
paint. Thickened dye can be used with rubber stamps, but the dye
tends to degrade the rubber fairly quickly. There are however a large
number of vegetable based resists that can be used with rubber stamps
and cause them no damage whatsoever. Stamping these resists and then
applying dye with a brush can yield very satisfactory results that
last longer than paint.
--

Legolas is my house elf
 




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