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A Favor of you Please



 
 
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  #71  
Old August 18th 03, 10:40 PM
Ann
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Right on all counts Diana
It was really tough writing what I did but I knew it's also a good thing to
share.

I'm slowly getting through everyone else's "favours to Diana" and they are
all very interesting.
Thanks for asking.

Ann

"Diana Curtis" wrote in message
...
That is so wonderful! Its the power of love that your mother was able to
suit her works to the people she wanted to give them to. She sounds like

an
amazing, giving person. It must be hard to go on without her sometimes.
Thank you for sharing her with us here.
Hugs,
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44

"Ann" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Thanks Diana and Jalynne.

My Mom was a remarkable lady.
All of her grandchildren know how precious that Mother's Day was and the
quilts they received. Mom had made some of the quilts with a certain

person
in mind. It's amazing but that person picked the quilt that was made

with
them in mind.

Ann

"Diana Curtis" wrote in message
...
Thank you Jalynne, I dont think I could have said it better myself.
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"Jalynne" wrote in message
k.net...
Oh, Ann, what a wonderful, moving story! What a great legacy your

mom
left you all.
Wow! See...that's how I see quilting, parts of us we leave behind

with
everyone we
teach to quilt, give a quilt, or sees our quilts. It's our mark on

the
world. If we
can pass on our love of quilts and quilting to just one person, who

then
in turn
passes it on....what a difference we will have made!

--
Jalynne
Queen Gypsy (snail mail available upon request)
see what i've been up to at www.100megsfree4.com/jalynne


"Ann" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Diana, so glad you are recovering.



I discovered rctq a couple years ago. I didn't read the posts on

a
regular
basis but when I stopped in I enjoyed the posts and kept thinking

that
I
needed to jump in. It wasn't until very recently that I took the
plunge,
and now read every day. I stay because you are a very

knowledgeable
group
of people and your help and suggestions are invaluable. I don't

think
I
have come across a question that went unanswered.



My Mom taught me how to sew at a very young age. I remember

cutting
out
patterns with Mom's right handed scissors until my poor left hand

was
numb.
It wasn't until I was an adult that I owned my first pair of left

handed
scissors!!. I sewed until I got married, then made curtains, baby
clothes,
doll clothes and dresses from my nieces. Once my boys got into

school
I
put the sewing on hold for a while. About 20 years ago (maybe

longer)
I
took my first quilting class. Prior to the class we were given

our
supply
list for the rail fence pattern. My selection of fabric was a

mixture
of
cottons and poly cottons. What did a 20 something year old know!!

I
enjoyed the coming together of that quilt. I was amazed that 6

fabrics,
sewn together in different order, turned this way or that way

could
create a
different effect.



During my sons growing up years I had little time to myself, but

took
a
few
quilting classes. Classes were great because you could attend, do

your
cutting and sewing without the interruptions of children and

hubby.
I
didn'
t *need* a class, but I found classes to be a great motivator.



My Mom quilted and was a very good at it. Many of her quilts were

hand
quilted. She always had projects on the go, and at various stages

of
completion. She had blocks to appliqué that were easy to take

along,
she
had pieces cut out to sew on the machine, she had squares cut out

ready
to
sew together, quilts ready to hand quilt. Mom was diagnosed with
ovarian
cancer and the chemo treatments started shortly thereafter. It

was
not
meant to be. From the time of diagnosis to the time she passed

away
was
6
months. She spent the majority of that time in hospital. On

Mother's
Day
last year all of her family, all 13 of us, gathered at the

hospital
with
Mom
and her quilts. The nurses so kindly let us use the dining room

and
we
set
out all of her quilts. All our names were put in a hat and as a

name
was
pulled out we picked a quilt to call our own. Everyone got 3

quilts,
Mom
had that many!! After she passed away, and dividing up her

things,
as
I
was
the only quilter in the family, I got Mom's quilting supplies,

frames
and
gadgets and stashes and all of her works in progress.



So, my future quilting plans involve finishing Mom's projects, or

at
least
learning what to do to finish. Which involves techniques I

haven't
done
before, and decisions on how they go together. I will never lack
something
"quilty" to do



Ann














Ads
  #72  
Old August 18th 03, 11:02 PM
Diana Curtis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

That is a great goal. Finishing feels pretty darn good!
Thank you for sharing your story!
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"Lisa Ellis" wrote in message
...
I started reading RCTQ and posting occasionally after I discovered it
when messing around on the internet at work. I like the mix of
personalities here so I keep on reading. Also, I don't currently belong
to a quilt club, so this group serves the same function for me. I like
knowing what is going on in the 'quilting world.'

I have been quilting for a long time, about 28 years. I started
quilting after I bought a quilting magaizine (Quilt World?) and a book
that had a chapter on quilting. My first quilt was a tied quilt for my
bed, just squares of velvets, corderorys and cottons, which wore out
long ago. When my son was born, I made a similar, small quilt for him,
and used a old blanket for the batting. I gave it to a friend when my
ds out grew it, and she used it as a car blanket for a long time.

In the future, I hope to finish the tops I have done over the years, and
to make some new ones; to put a dent into my stash. . .

lisae



Diana Curtis wrote:
Im recovering well... certain things coming in the mail keep my spirits

up,
thank you muchly! But the days linger long sometimes. I havent energy to

do
much yet, but you, yes YOU, have the power to entertain and amuse me if

you
feel like it, and I hope you do...
Would you please tell me how you came to post at RCTQ, and why you stay,

and
how you came to be a quilter and what you hope to find in your quilting
future. Maybe everyone else will get some pleasure in reading these ..

then
I wont feel so selfish! lol
Thanks in advance,
Diana the slightly bored

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44





  #73  
Old August 18th 03, 11:16 PM
Diana Curtis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you Jalynne, I dont think I could have said it better myself.
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"Jalynne" wrote in message
k.net...
Oh, Ann, what a wonderful, moving story! What a great legacy your mom

left you all.
Wow! See...that's how I see quilting, parts of us we leave behind with

everyone we
teach to quilt, give a quilt, or sees our quilts. It's our mark on the

world. If we
can pass on our love of quilts and quilting to just one person, who then

in turn
passes it on....what a difference we will have made!

--
Jalynne
Queen Gypsy (snail mail available upon request)
see what i've been up to at www.100megsfree4.com/jalynne


"Ann" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Diana, so glad you are recovering.



I discovered rctq a couple years ago. I didn't read the posts on a

regular
basis but when I stopped in I enjoyed the posts and kept thinking that I
needed to jump in. It wasn't until very recently that I took the

plunge,
and now read every day. I stay because you are a very knowledgeable

group
of people and your help and suggestions are invaluable. I don't think I
have come across a question that went unanswered.



My Mom taught me how to sew at a very young age. I remember cutting out
patterns with Mom's right handed scissors until my poor left hand was

numb.
It wasn't until I was an adult that I owned my first pair of left handed
scissors!!. I sewed until I got married, then made curtains, baby

clothes,
doll clothes and dresses from my nieces. Once my boys got into school

I
put the sewing on hold for a while. About 20 years ago (maybe longer) I
took my first quilting class. Prior to the class we were given our

supply
list for the rail fence pattern. My selection of fabric was a mixture

of
cottons and poly cottons. What did a 20 something year old know!! I
enjoyed the coming together of that quilt. I was amazed that 6 fabrics,
sewn together in different order, turned this way or that way could

create a
different effect.



During my sons growing up years I had little time to myself, but took a

few
quilting classes. Classes were great because you could attend, do your
cutting and sewing without the interruptions of children and hubby. I

didn'
t *need* a class, but I found classes to be a great motivator.



My Mom quilted and was a very good at it. Many of her quilts were hand
quilted. She always had projects on the go, and at various stages of
completion. She had blocks to appliqué that were easy to take along,

she
had pieces cut out to sew on the machine, she had squares cut out ready

to
sew together, quilts ready to hand quilt. Mom was diagnosed with

ovarian
cancer and the chemo treatments started shortly thereafter. It was not
meant to be. From the time of diagnosis to the time she passed away was

6
months. She spent the majority of that time in hospital. On Mother's

Day
last year all of her family, all 13 of us, gathered at the hospital with

Mom
and her quilts. The nurses so kindly let us use the dining room and we

set
out all of her quilts. All our names were put in a hat and as a name

was
pulled out we picked a quilt to call our own. Everyone got 3 quilts,

Mom
had that many!! After she passed away, and dividing up her things, as I

was
the only quilter in the family, I got Mom's quilting supplies, frames

and
gadgets and stashes and all of her works in progress.



So, my future quilting plans involve finishing Mom's projects, or at

least
learning what to do to finish. Which involves techniques I haven't done
before, and decisions on how they go together. I will never lack

something
"quilty" to do



Ann








  #74  
Old August 18th 03, 11:16 PM
Diana Curtis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you Ann, your story is most touching. What a loving gift your mother
gave, her quilts, her time, herself, her love.
I envy you that.
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"Ann" wrote in message
news:[email protected]
Diana, so glad you are recovering.



I discovered rctq a couple years ago. I didn't read the posts on a

regular
basis but when I stopped in I enjoyed the posts and kept thinking that I
needed to jump in. It wasn't until very recently that I took the plunge,
and now read every day. I stay because you are a very knowledgeable group
of people and your help and suggestions are invaluable. I don't think I
have come across a question that went unanswered.



My Mom taught me how to sew at a very young age. I remember cutting out
patterns with Mom's right handed scissors until my poor left hand was

numb.
It wasn't until I was an adult that I owned my first pair of left handed
scissors!!. I sewed until I got married, then made curtains, baby

clothes,
doll clothes and dresses from my nieces. Once my boys got into school I
put the sewing on hold for a while. About 20 years ago (maybe longer) I
took my first quilting class. Prior to the class we were given our

supply
list for the rail fence pattern. My selection of fabric was a mixture of
cottons and poly cottons. What did a 20 something year old know!! I
enjoyed the coming together of that quilt. I was amazed that 6 fabrics,
sewn together in different order, turned this way or that way could create

a
different effect.



During my sons growing up years I had little time to myself, but took a

few
quilting classes. Classes were great because you could attend, do your
cutting and sewing without the interruptions of children and hubby. I

didn'
t *need* a class, but I found classes to be a great motivator.



My Mom quilted and was a very good at it. Many of her quilts were hand
quilted. She always had projects on the go, and at various stages of
completion. She had blocks to appliqué that were easy to take along, she
had pieces cut out to sew on the machine, she had squares cut out ready to
sew together, quilts ready to hand quilt. Mom was diagnosed with ovarian
cancer and the chemo treatments started shortly thereafter. It was not
meant to be. From the time of diagnosis to the time she passed away was 6
months. She spent the majority of that time in hospital. On Mother's Day
last year all of her family, all 13 of us, gathered at the hospital with

Mom
and her quilts. The nurses so kindly let us use the dining room and we

set
out all of her quilts. All our names were put in a hat and as a name was
pulled out we picked a quilt to call our own. Everyone got 3 quilts, Mom
had that many!! After she passed away, and dividing up her things, as I

was
the only quilter in the family, I got Mom's quilting supplies, frames and
gadgets and stashes and all of her works in progress.



So, my future quilting plans involve finishing Mom's projects, or at least
learning what to do to finish. Which involves techniques I haven't done
before, and decisions on how they go together. I will never lack

something
"quilty" to do



Ann






  #75  
Old August 18th 03, 11:40 PM
Diana Curtis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

LOL... love it.
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"rdquiltkat" wrote in message
...
On August 18 2003, Pati wrote:

I guess I do have a rather warped outlook on life sometimes G. Must
have something to do with living with a writer who is a born punster
for the last 20+ years. G


Sounds like your DH would get along well with my son. He has a button he
wears that says "Incorrigible punster. Please do not incorrige."
LOL....I've been thinking about embroidering that on a T shirt for him.

--
Sonja in Red Deer, Alberta



  #76  
Old August 18th 03, 11:41 PM
Diana Curtis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Thank you Ally,
every post I have read in this thread has made me smile, and think, and that
makes me feel better!
Im glad you found home here too!
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"ally" wrote in message
...
In article , Diana Curtis
writes
Im recovering well... certain things coming in the mail keep my spirits

up,
thank you muchly! But the days linger long sometimes. I havent energy to

do
much yet, but you, yes YOU, have the power to entertain and amuse me if

you
feel like it, and I hope you do...
Would you please tell me how you came to post at RCTQ, and why you stay,

and
how you came to be a quilter and what you hope to find in your quilting
future. Maybe everyone else will get some pleasure in reading these ..

then
I wont feel so selfish! lol
Thanks in advance,
Diana the slightly bored

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44


Hmm I joined when I first got my own computer and got online (until then
I had been looking at a few ngs on a friends computer at his home once a
week). That musta been in '97 but I have a real bad memory so it could
have been a year either side.

I joined this ng cos I liked quilting. I stay because its like home -
warm and comfy and full of people who I love, even though we all get
made at each other sometimes. I have made some of my best friends here
and done things I would never have done otherwise.

Hope you're feeling better real soon.
:-)
--
ally



  #77  
Old August 19th 03, 12:09 AM
Sharon Harper
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

A lovely story Diana (almost as lovely as you!).

--
Sharon From Melbourne Australia (Qof DU)
http://www.geocities.com/shazrules/index.html
Member of the Houston 2004 Party Animals
"Diana Curtis" wrote in message
...
Well... I was waiting till everyone else had their say but since you asked
so nicely Ill dive in now.
I wanted to make quilts because they looked so homey. This was back in

the
hippy days of make it yourself. My mom was a wonderful clothing maker but
had not tried making quilts. I couldnt learn it from her or any other

family
member so I learned the basics from a woman who was over from South Africa
on a strange Tom Sawyer type adventure with a young man from California. I
made a few blocks and that was about it until a few years later when I

made
my first quilt. That was a laughable yet loveable affair, all cotton

sheets
and bits and bobs from Moms sewing bag. There was a badger of fleece and a
muskie *fish* out of uncut cordoroy, and it was machine everything I

think.
It had part of a comforter, nylon covered, as its batt and my ex took it

in
the divorce and later returned it. The batt is making a return appearence

in
my siggy quilt!
Later I made quilts from cotton and poly cotton cause it was I could get
for free.or frugally.. and I made quilts.
Or quilt tops anyway.
My son found me RCTQ some years ago. I posted hesitantly at first... then
somehow I finally figured it out, that I was welcome here, no matter how
wonky my seams... no matter if I ever finished a quilt or not. It seemed
that my brand of playing around was fine, that it was not a quilt police
kind of group. Now, youd have to use dynamite to get rid of me. I cant
picture a time when I wont want to come here to laugh, or mourn, or
celebrate (anything.. heck.. a day of good health seems a good reason to
smile and say whooohoooo!) and maybe even talk quilting a bit!
Oh, thats what held me back at first. I felt I had nothing to offer... I
am not a technically good quilter.
As for the mead... cyber mead is my strength.. but its super strong..
believe me! LOL
Hugs,
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"Paul & Suzie Beckwith" wrote in

message
...
Aha - if you like mead, you need to get Anty Krysia to send you a
bottle of honey vodka - Krupnik - from Poland - its like mead, but on
steroids...

And - picture the scene if you will - O'Hare Airport Immigration desk,
"what is the purpose of your visit"
"to visit friends off the internet" and me promptly digging in my
purse for a well-thumbed piece of paper with Sarah's address written
on it.. you should have seen the look on the immigration officers
face...

Suzie B
p.s. - when you gonna tell us why you started and etc?
--
"From the internet connection under the pier"
Southend, UK
http://community.webshots.com/user/suziekga





  #78  
Old August 19th 03, 12:16 AM
Butterfly
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

My Dad did.
Killed an axe that is.
Was out chooping wood for kindling (we had a wood burning furnace) and
the head of the axe flew off. Came in the house and announced he was
done for the day--he had killed the axe. The wood handle had split and
the head of the axe went flying off. Can't remember how he fixed it but
we certainly were NOT allowed to be outside when anyone was chopping wood.
Butterfly (we knew better than to giggle)

Diana Curtis wrote:

Thank you for the wonderful tale of how you came to be here and there. You
are officially what we call a starter. Nothing wrong with that!
It sounds like your new course of action is just right for you, and I hope
it turns out to be as relaxing as you hope.
I always wondered how that fambly tree came to be. Its confused me from
the start even tho now I claim to be one of the dotty Aunties *the one in
the attic with the cane for stompin' for more mead*.
It never ceases to amaze me, the open hearts of the people in this group.
Imagine, taking you in, sight unseen like that.. without a second thought..
people must have thought both you and the offer givers were Nuts! but.. aha!
we disprove the rule that all internet people are axe murdereres...ask my
DH, he never murdered an axe in his life!
Thank you again for helping me pass a few more minutes distracted from the
itchy staples and stuff.
Hugs,
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"Paul & Suzie Beckwith" wrote in message
...

Slightly bored Diana - or mad? Make a fresh pot of tea and gird your
loins for a long-winded episode... "Queen of the Waffle" you will dub
me after this...

I came to this newsgroup prolly around 1998, as I wanted to make a
quilt for my sister who loves narrowboats, and I posted asking if
anyone knew of anywhere I could get canal-related fabric - roses &
castles, narrowboats etc... Never found anything that I could use,
"Rosie & Jim" fabric just ain't what I was after, so I decided to go a
different way with Jills quilt, and go for a pieced boat instead...
its still in the planning stage... (now where have we heard that
before I wonder!!)

I quickly found that everybody posting on here was warm, friendly and
(in general) two bolts short of a fabric store just like myself, so I
stayed and joined in. I got so involved that I became "Beloved
Grandorter" of RH Lady CD and the RCTQ geneology tree grew several new
branches and then turned into a corkscrew hazel...

After both Paul and I had been off work for a few weeks with severe
depression from work, back in 1999, I posted that the doctor had
suggested we took a holiday to cheer us both up, and asked for
suggestions as to where we could go. I jokingly said "we can even
afford the airfare to America"... and within 24 hours we had offers of
accommodation from practically 52 states - it certainly wasn't my
intention to "bum" accommodation at all, and it took several emails
and telephone calls to confirm that the offers we'd had were all
genuine, from people we'd never met, who were throwing open their arms
and their homes and inviting us to come and stay.

After several weeks of careful planning we flew to the USA and spent 3
weeks meeting up with our beloved Miss Sairey, Donna (& Wayne) in
Idaho, Donna in Bellevue, Sandi & Deni, Tiggrrr, Judy the Red Queen,
Anna, and loads of other wonderful people from all over the place. We
were pampered, spoiled rotten and generally treated like royalty
wherever we went. We'll never forget the way that we were made to feel
part of the family where-ever we went, by people who only knew me by
my internet callsign... we even managed to pay some of it back when
The Red Queen graced our sofa for a few days when she came over to
England for the Malvern quilt show in 2000.

And I think that really sums up RCTQ - it doesn't matter who you are,
where you live, what colour you are (as you all know I am
sky-blue-pink with yellow stripes...) as long as you have an interest
in quilting, whether as a passing interest or a lifelong obsession,
then you are all accepted here. We're all family here, we share the
ups and downs of everyday life with each other, we dance when we're
happy and offer wings of strength when needed. We can sound off about
something that has annoyed us that day at work, or sing from the
rooftops when our children graduate. We share everything, because we
are family.

As for my quilting, its hit and miss at the best of times... I started
prolly around 1996, we'd left Roman re-enactment and were looking
around for another period, and at a multi-period show got talking with
an American Civil War re-enactor who had a quilting frame in her
tent... we almost picked that period but research showed that
patchwork had been around since at least 1795 (one of the earliest
patterns documented is Grandmothers Flower Garden from that year), so
we settled on Napoleonic re-enactment instead, portraying the years
1805-1815...

My first quilt was tumbling blocks pieced over papers, and its still a
UFO... I've made a pieced cat quilt for my M&D's 50th wedding
anniversary, am working on a historical GFG using fabrics reminiscent
of those around during the Napoleonic era, completed a small
wall-hanging for a competition and a crib quilt for a friends new
baby. I even took on a commission for a pieced & appliqued quilt from
a work colleague, its in pieces on the back of the sofa as I write
this as I've developed quilters block with it...and then I discovered
City & Guilds patchwork courses were being offered at out local
evening class centre.

I completed the first year, making a lap quilt and almost finishing a
bag to hold my cutting mat and rulers in, then started the second
year, and after hand dyeing and hand-piecing a cushion cover, decided
that I just couldn't take the pressure of the class whilst working
full time, and having parents who live 3 hours drive away who were
ill. The coursework was taking over my life and my lounge, and was
making me ill. Quitting the course was the hardest decision I'd made
for a long while, but such a relief.

I've now joined a local stitching club, and am about to start a
sampler quilt (from the Lynne Edwards New Sampler book), stitching 2
blocks a month whether at home or at the club. Some of these ladies
have apparently never picked up a needle in their lives, so we're
gonna take it real slow and leisurely like... and I'm really looking
forward to it! Just think, sitting with a cup of tea stitching and
chatting to the new friends I've made, instead of worrying about
whether my coursework is up to scratch... its gonna be heaven... doing
something for myself instead for a teacher... and with friendly people
around me who can show me how to piece curves, or do those pointy bits
in applique, or 1000 other things that City & Guilds will never teach
you.

So thats my tale - now get up and take a short walk to the bathroom
and stretch those muscles out - they need it!

Suzie B
--
"From the internet connection under the pier"
Southend, UK
http://community.webshots.com/user/suziekga





  #79  
Old August 19th 03, 01:04 AM
Lisa Ellis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Welcome. I can see that you will fit in here :-)

lisae

sdgodfrey wrote:




But since everyone keeps insisting it's too hot for chocolate, the
welcome wagon can send FQ's (Fat Quarters or Finished Quilts). VBEG


  #80  
Old August 19th 03, 01:24 AM
Diana Curtis
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Well... I was waiting till everyone else had their say but since you asked
so nicely Ill dive in now.
I wanted to make quilts because they looked so homey. This was back in the
hippy days of make it yourself. My mom was a wonderful clothing maker but
had not tried making quilts. I couldnt learn it from her or any other family
member so I learned the basics from a woman who was over from South Africa
on a strange Tom Sawyer type adventure with a young man from California. I
made a few blocks and that was about it until a few years later when I made
my first quilt. That was a laughable yet loveable affair, all cotton sheets
and bits and bobs from Moms sewing bag. There was a badger of fleece and a
muskie *fish* out of uncut cordoroy, and it was machine everything I think.
It had part of a comforter, nylon covered, as its batt and my ex took it in
the divorce and later returned it. The batt is making a return appearence in
my siggy quilt!
Later I made quilts from cotton and poly cotton cause it was I could get
for free.or frugally.. and I made quilts.
Or quilt tops anyway.
My son found me RCTQ some years ago. I posted hesitantly at first... then
somehow I finally figured it out, that I was welcome here, no matter how
wonky my seams... no matter if I ever finished a quilt or not. It seemed
that my brand of playing around was fine, that it was not a quilt police
kind of group. Now, youd have to use dynamite to get rid of me. I cant
picture a time when I wont want to come here to laugh, or mourn, or
celebrate (anything.. heck.. a day of good health seems a good reason to
smile and say whooohoooo!) and maybe even talk quilting a bit!
Oh, thats what held me back at first. I felt I had nothing to offer... I
am not a technically good quilter.
As for the mead... cyber mead is my strength.. but its super strong..
believe me! LOL
Hugs,
Diana

--
http://photos.yahoo.com/lunamom44
"Paul & Suzie Beckwith" wrote in message
...
Aha - if you like mead, you need to get Anty Krysia to send you a
bottle of honey vodka - Krupnik - from Poland - its like mead, but on
steroids...

And - picture the scene if you will - O'Hare Airport Immigration desk,
"what is the purpose of your visit"
"to visit friends off the internet" and me promptly digging in my
purse for a well-thumbed piece of paper with Sarah's address written
on it.. you should have seen the look on the immigration officers
face...

Suzie B
p.s. - when you gonna tell us why you started and etc?
--
"From the internet connection under the pier"
Southend, UK
http://community.webshots.com/user/suziekga



 




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