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-   -   New Log Cabin Quilt (http://www.craftbanter.com/showthread.php?t=81086)

witchystitcher February 23rd 07 01:36 PM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 
A teacher I work with, who is otherwise an exceptional teacher, never
uses the word 'an.' Instead he talks about, "a apple, a A on a exam."
Drives me nuts.

Linda
PATCHogue, NY

Jessamy February 23rd 07 03:39 PM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 
akkk! I am busy teaching my kids about *an* which is more complicated as
most of the English they know I taught them in the first place and they
speak Dutch at school. one would expect people to do better especially
teachers however all the things I have read in this thread have made me
cringe. I did once correct my English teacher when he said something wrong
and then said: "that's right isn't it jessamy" I told the truth and said no
and ended up with an angry teacher so I walked out of the class and headed
to the principals office , complained and refused to take anymore English
lessons telling him that my English was miles better than the teachers
despite me being dyslexic. 6 weeks of no English later the teacher came and
apologised to me in public :-D and he never asked me if he was right again
HAHAHA

--
Jessamy
Queen of Chocolate Squishies (and Occasional Liquorice Ones)
In The Netherlands
Take out: _I love the colour_ to reply.
www.geocities.com/jessamy_thompson
http://uk.pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/jes...pson/my_photos
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
A teacher I work with, who is otherwise an exceptional teacher, never
uses the word 'an.' Instead he talks about, "a apple, a A on a exam."
Drives me nuts.

Linda
PATCHogue, NY



Sandy Ellison February 23rd 07 03:52 PM

OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky
 
Howdy!

I grew up down on the border w/ Mexico.
The Hispanic migrant workers' children (or migrant working students)
usually didn't show up to school until late in October; missing
the first 2 months of school makes for too much work to catch up.
The hardest subject to catch up on was (usually) "language arts."
It just goes too fast. And we take it for granted when we grow
up in English-speaking homes that the subject will be taught at
our level. I still admire those non-English speakers who do put
up w/ all the weirdness involved in learning "English."
Which makes it all the more irritating to hear those who have
had all the advantages of a "U.S. English" education
speaking it so poorly. Some of the ignorance is a choice.

I ain't no expert, either. ;-)

If "it goes without saying", why say it anyway? ;-P

Ragmop/Sandy--ready to Finish another quilt but the beauty of the
outdoors is calling, calling me...



On 2/22/07 10:04 PM, in article
, "Ginger in CA"
wrote:

I volunteer teach adult literacy, and for the most part my student is
a person whose native language is not English. I teach one-on-one so
we are able to really get into the meaty discussions about grammar and
how English is such a strange language. I usually end up teaching not
only the reading but also the speaking aspect of English. Until I
listened to the blunders and laughed along with my students, I
couldn't appreciate how much effort they go to, to learn the language!

Ginger in CA


On Feb 22, 6:51 pm, Sandy Ellison wrote:
Howdy!

"I could care less" which is wrong-wrong-wrong.
The expression is "I care so little I couldn't possibly care less!"
or "I couldn't care less!" ;-P




Sandy Ellison February 23rd 07 05:10 PM

Off Topic OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky
 
Howdy!

BobDole syndrome: Mr.Dole is a U.S. politician with a habit of speaking
of himself in the 3rd person.
Reporter: "Mr.Dole, do you have a plan for dealing with the lack of health
care for children?"
Mr.Dole: "Bob Dole has a plan. Bob Dole wants to count those children
and find out how many don't have insurance. That's what Bob Dole will do."
g Might me a hangover from Mr.Nixon who used a similar technique:
"You won't have Richard Nixon to kick around any more."

Megan: "just for the sin of owning something" -- thank you! ;-D

Ragmop/Sandy http://www.museum.state.il.us/muslink/art/htmls/ks.html

On 2/23/07 4:16 AM, in article ,
"Sally Swindells" wrote:

Sandy Ellison wrote:
Howdy!

"I could care less" which is wrong-wrong-wrong.
The expression is "I care so little I couldn't possibly care less!"
or "I couldn't care less!" ;-P



Or 'myself' instead of 'me'. Perhaps people are so full of their own
importance that they choose a more important sounding name!

--
Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~ (uk)
http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin


Sandy February 23rd 07 05:53 PM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 
In article ,
"Jessamy" wrote:

akkk! I am busy teaching my kids about *an* which is more complicated as
most of the English they know I taught them in the first place and they
speak Dutch at school. one would expect people to do better especially
teachers however all the things I have read in this thread have made me
cringe. I did once correct my English teacher when he said something wrong
and then said: "that's right isn't it jessamy" I told the truth and said no
and ended up with an angry teacher so I walked out of the class and headed
to the principals office , complained and refused to take anymore English
lessons telling him that my English was miles better than the teachers
despite me being dyslexic. 6 weeks of no English later the teacher came and
apologised to me in public :-D and he never asked me if he was right again
HAHAHA



Good for you, Jessamy! My elder DD once had a middle school English
teacher (by no stretch of the imagination was he either an English
teacher or any kind of teacher) who gave a test and graded it
incorrectly. When DD brought it home, I just about had apoplexy (isn't
that a wonderful word? G) and corrected his corrections, explaining in
writing why his corrections were wrong. DD took the test back to school,
as required, and the teacher was so "threatened" that he never again
sent any papers home. Needless to say, I complained to the
administration. This was a teacher who had been bounced around from one
school to another because of his incompetence, but no one could fire
him. :( The children paid the penalty, sadly.

--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sfoster 1 (at) earthlink (dot) net (remove/change the obvious)
http://home.earthlink.net/~sfoster1

Sandy February 23rd 07 05:54 PM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 
In article ,
Megan Zurawicz wrote:

My favorite example of that is "off tin". T in "often" has been silent how
many centuries? when these folks decide to be "cultured-er than thou" and
studiously enunciate it.......

--pig



I'm with you on that one, Piglet! Aaaarrrrgghhh!

--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sfoster 1 (at) earthlink (dot) net (remove/change the obvious)
http://home.earthlink.net/~sfoster1

Sandy February 23rd 07 05:55 PM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 
In article ,
"CATS" wrote:

" I am eruditerer than you" rofl

But then the UK and Commonwealth countries would have a
laugh over anomalies like Lieutenant

US = loo-ten-ant
UK = lef-ten-ant

--

Cheryl & the Cats in OZ
o o o o
( Y ) ( Y )
Boofhead Donut
http://community.webshots.com/user/witchofthewest
catsatararatATyahooDOTcomDOTau



And it's really a French word.... ;)

--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sfoster 1 (at) earthlink (dot) net (remove/change the obvious)
http://home.earthlink.net/~sfoster1

Sandy February 23rd 07 06:07 PM

OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky
 
In article .com,
"Ginger in CA" wrote:

I volunteer teach adult literacy, and for the most part my student is
a person whose native language is not English. I teach one-on-one so
we are able to really get into the meaty discussions about grammar and
how English is such a strange language. I usually end up teaching not
only the reading but also the speaking aspect of English. Until I
listened to the blunders and laughed along with my students, I
couldn't appreciate how much effort they go to, to learn the language!

Ginger in CA



Ginger, I ended up teaching a lot of English when I was teaching French
-- purely accidentally. g It was always odd to me to hear one of my
Spanish-speaking students ask why something was said in a certain way in
French, when it didn't translate that way into English. My stock
response was to ask them how to say a similar thing in Spanish, which
was almost always a direct parallel to the French. Then I'd say it was
*English* that was so strange. LOL!

--
Sandy in Henderson, near Las Vegas
sfoster 1 (at) earthlink (dot) net (remove/change the obvious)
http://home.earthlink.net/~sfoster1

Kathy Applebaum February 23rd 07 09:29 PM

OT:Bad English teachers (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)
 

"Sandy" wrote in message
...

Good for you, Jessamy! My elder DD once had a middle school English
teacher (by no stretch of the imagination was he either an English
teacher or any kind of teacher) who gave a test and graded it
incorrectly.


Boy, does that bring back memories! :)

My middle school English teacher (who also wasn't a teacher of any kind)
used to make us do book reports. No problem there. We had to start out
saying what kind of book it was -- novel, history, etc. One of the books I
read was called "Words of the Myths", which is a book about words that
derive from Greek and Roman myths. I asked my mom what kind of book it was
and she suggested "philology". I looked the word up and agreed.

I hand in my paper, and it's returned with philology marked as misspelled. I
marched over to the teacher and complained that I knew the word was *not*
misspelled, as I had copied the spelling directly from the dictionary when I
looked it up. The teacher shrugged and said "Oh, I didn't know what it meant
so I marked it misspelled." What an inspiration she was to the young people
of Sacramento.

The one good thing to come from the incident is that I will never forget the
meaning or spelling of philology. *evil grin*

--
Kathy A. (Woodland, CA)
Queen of Fabric Tramps

http://fabrictramp.typepad.com/fabric_tramping/
remove the obvious to reply



Kathy Applebaum February 23rd 07 09:35 PM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 

"Sandy" wrote in message
...
In article ,
Megan Zurawicz wrote:

My favorite example of that is "off tin". T in "often" has been silent
how
many centuries? when these folks decide to be "cultured-er than thou" and
studiously enunciate it.......

--pig



I'm with you on that one, Piglet! Aaaarrrrgghhh!

While I'm not guilty of that particular crime, I did often (used
intentionally) mispronounce words as a child. Why? Because I had learned
them from reading. I'd look up the meaning, but the pronunciation guides in
dictionaries mystified me, so I didn't always have the correct pronunciation
stuck in my head.

I was also guilty of learning a lot of words just by context, without
looking them up. A local hospital had a sign that read "Permission to pass
over revocable at any time." For years I wondered exactly what type of cable
a revo-cable was, and why the hospital felt the need to post a sign saying
it was okay to pass over it.
--
Kathy A. (Woodland, CA)
Queen of Fabric Tramps

http://fabrictramp.typepad.com/fabric_tramping/
remove the obvious to reply




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