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-   -   New Log Cabin Quilt (http://www.craftbanter.com/showthread.php?t=81086)

Sally Swindells February 23rd 07 09:43 AM

OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt)
 
CATS wrote:
Just yesterday the 11yo from next door brought me an "essay"
he had written to show me his ribbon for best in class.

It was only two small pages of large writing of course, but
the teacher had not corrected a single spelling or grammar
mistake! I'm not talking about dangling participles here -
I mean there was almost no punctuation and any word over two
syllables was phonetically spelled out (and not well at
that!). Now this child loves to read, and when I questioned
him he said he thought some of his writing was "wrong" but
that the teacher didn't care as long as it was at least two
pages.

This boy goes to secondary school next year, and from what I
have observed there is no effort there to correct writing
standards either. One girl I tutored had her work corrected
when she was right and the teacher was wrong! I wanted to
write to the school but as I am not a parent there the girl
asked me not to as she didn't want the teacher getting mad
at her. What hope have we of producing literate students
with attitudes like that, and when even school report cards
come home with errors?



DD has never had any difficulty with spelling, but when she was about 8
she had leisure corrected as leasure! She had to write it out three
times at the bottom of the page, and much to her disgust it was a new
book and the first page is always special. Again it was a rather
vindictive teacher, the school year was coming to an end and she decided
it was a lesson in keeping quiet and not rocking the boat. She can still
spell leisure properly, and whenever she saw the teacher (who lived near
us) you could hear "can't spell leisure" said under her breath.

Both children always had a list of spellings to learn during the week
with a test on Monday morning, but DS always had to work hard on his.
The family still uses his mind-joggers as 'family words' e.g. boAt,
parliAment.


--
Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~ (uk)
http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin

Sally Swindells February 23rd 07 09:59 AM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 


A trend I have noticed lately is the way some people pronounce words
that start with 's'. Instead of saying 'street' for example, they say
'shtreet'. Or 'shweet' for 'sweet'. Or 'shtring' for 'string'. Listen
to Tyra Banks sometime. She speaks this way. I've noticed this more
and more on TV, sometimes from reporters on national or cable news
shows.

Will listen for those!

My pet hate is difficult to describe, but is what I call 'false
gentrification' of the language. This is the inability to pronounce
words like 'little' with the emphasis on the 'li', and the 't's said
quickly with the 'le', so its LI tl. Instead it now seems to be liTTel,
and hospital has become hospiTTal with the tongue brought really far
forward behind the teeth to bet the full effect of those 'T's. Almost
becomes what used to be described as 'short tongued'.

Also hate the name of the letter H being pronounced as Haitch instead of
Aitch. Have even heard it in tv adverts for HMV and HSBC.
--
Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~ (uk)
http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin

Sally Swindells February 23rd 07 10:16 AM

OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky
 
Sandy Ellison wrote:
Howdy!

"I could care less" which is wrong-wrong-wrong.
The expression is "I care so little I couldn't possibly care less!"
or "I couldn't care less!" ;-P

Heard too often (and have read it twice so far in the latest book on my
list): "They wished he would have had the time..." instead of
"They wished he had had the time."

Are people afraid to use the word "me" instead of "I"?
"The prize was given to my husband and I"-- Yikes!
In today's newspaper: "The children she taught, like her, were poor foster
children." Oy!

But it's that first one that makes me holler, "You could, too!" ;-P

Ragmop/Sandy-- too tired to quilt another minute after spending time
working in the yard; set out some of my flagstones until
it got too hot (86*), extending the rock garden


On 2/22/07 3:59 PM, in article , "Donna in
Idaho" wrote:

My biggest pet peeve in this category is "your" when the writer really means
"you're." It's everywhere!


Or 'myself' instead of 'me'. Perhaps people are so full of their own
importance that they choose a more important sounding name!

--
Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~ (uk)
http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin

Sally Swindells February 23rd 07 10:26 AM

Thank Goodness for Message Blocking was OT: Grammar-Picky
 
CATS wrote:
"Edward W. Thompson" wrote

((snip))
:
: With respect to the subject being 'OnT', your reasoning is
bizarre.
: What is it about rec.crafts.textiles.quilting you find
difficult to
: comprehend?



Please feel free NOT to add snide or whiney comments to your
responses to clearly marked OT messages.

If you don't like seeing OT comments in a "quilting
orum" - and you have constantly made it clear that you
don't - then don't read them. And if you don't agree with
the comments of others either don't reply to them, or at
least try to remain civil (see definition below).

From M-W Dictionary -
synonyms CIVIL, POLITE, COURTEOUS, GALLANT, CHIVALROUS mean
observant of the forms required by good breeding. CIVIL
often suggests little more than the avoidance of overt
rudeness owed the questioner a civil reply. POLITE
commonly implies polish of speech and manners and sometimes
suggests an absence of cordiality if you can't be pleasant,
at least be polite. COURTEOUS implies more actively
considerate or dignified politeness clerks who were
unfailingly courteous to customers. GALLANT and CHIVALROUS
imply courteous attentiveness especially to women. GALLANT
suggests spirited and dashing behavior and ornate
expressions of courtesy a gallant suitor of the old
school. CHIVALROUS suggests high-minded and
self-sacrificing behavior a chivalrous display of duty.

If you are merely amusing yourself by testing how many
people you can annoy enough for them to snap back -
congratulations! You have caught me on a bad day. I have
snapped back (more from exasperation than anger), and you
have goaded me into being as rude to you as you are to this
group. Are you happy?



Message blocking applied in THIS reader too - I should
have remembered when I updated (sigh)!


But Cheryl, remember we adopted him as our pet troll the last time he
started berating us. Remember, egg, gravy etc.

--
Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~ (uk)
http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin

Megan Zurawicz February 23rd 07 11:10 AM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 
My favorite example of that is "off tin". T in "often" has been silent how
many centuries? when these folks decide to be "cultured-er than thou" and
studiously enunciate it.......

--pig


On 2/23/07 03:59, in article , "Sally
Swindells" wrote:

My pet hate is difficult to describe, but is what I call 'false
gentrification' of the language.



Megan Zurawicz February 23rd 07 11:14 AM

OT: apostrophe
 
I'm assuming the child in question is named Myles, yes?

When a name ends in an s, it's now acceptable to do the classic "apostrophe
s" for possession (Myles's) but more traditionally formally correct not to
double the s---simply don't add the last one (Myles').

Looks odd enough to some folks---they know "Myles's" looks wrong, but they
also "know" with a vengeance that it's got to end in 's somehow---that
they're willing to drop the s that's part of Myles to get the 's added.

Myles never becomes Myle, nor Charles Charle, just for the sin of owning
something. :)

--pig


On 2/22/07 23:18, in article
, "Dee in Oz"
wrote:

Okay I like correct spelling and grammar, but I know that thhat I have
a lot of room for improvement.


Apostrophes I am hopeless with, but I thought that the following
sentence form our local paper was wrong.

"Playing on Myle's bed with younger brother Philip......" Is that
wrong and what should it be or am I wrong ?


Dee in Oz



On Feb 23, 5:41 am, "Sunny" wrote:
Go, Pig! In my former life as a responsible, earning adult, I was a
writer. I was a newspaper writer/reporter for my entire career.
Newspapers often opt for "calarity over grammar" -- as if the two
were mutually exclusive. Drove me nuts. Even though I always intended
to be a reporter, my degree was in English Literature. My husband is
now City Editor of our local newspaper. He and I have had some snippy
discussions through our years together about language. His position is
that language and spelling are evolving, as they always have, and that
staid, stuffy traditionalists had better just give it up. My position
is that there is correct and there is incorrect and that people who
want to make their words public should first make certain that those
words are correct. I grit my teeth all the time when reading
everything from major daily newspapers to blogs. OMG people! Get a
tiny little copy of Strunk and White and learn to write the English
language.

(I am not talking about folks, like all of us here, who "talk" on
posting boards. I really don't get too worked up about grammar or
spelling or such when we are having what amounts to a friendly and
very casual conversation. Nobody here is intending to publish their
words and immortalize their posts, so please don't be offended by my
little rant here.)

Enough ranting. You get the picture. I fervantly wish that people who
write for public consumption would consult the necessary books/
websites/English teachers and write with precision and conformity to
standard English. And yes, I AM one of "those people".

Sunny
who grew up in rural, hicksville Texas saying such things as "nukuler
mirs" and "liberry" and "it's down around the co'ner", and if I can
learn and change, anybody can





Megan Zurawicz February 23rd 07 11:16 AM

OT: The Congenitally Grammar-Picky (was OT Grammar Book
 
What part of the fact that this thread has been labelled off topic from its
very beginning do you not understand?

Seems silly to me to argue that a clearly marked off topic thread is off
topic. Yes, thank you, I was quite aware this was water-cooler conversation
when I started it, and clearly so labelled it. :)

--pig


On 2/23/07 00:42, in article ,
"Edward W. Thompson" wrote:

With respect to the subject being 'OnT', your reasoning is bizarre.
What is it about rec.crafts.textiles.quilting you find difficult to
comprehend?



Cats February 23rd 07 12:13 PM

Thank Goodness for Message Blocking was OT: Grammar-Picky
 
Call me when he's cooked - I will bring the carving knife!
Until then he is just a little too annoying for me in my
present frame of mind. But if you guys want to bait him a
little go right ahead. I will cheer from the side lines
lol

Trolls - beware!

--

Cheryl & the Cats in OZ
o o o o
( Y ) ( Y )
Boofhead Donut
http://community.webshots.com/user/witchofthewest
catsatararatATyahooDOTcomDOTau


"Sally Swindells" wrote
in message ...
: CATS wrote:
: "Edward W. Thompson" wrote
:
: ((snip))
: :
: : With respect to the subject being 'OnT', your
reasoning is
: bizarre.
: : What is it about rec.crafts.textiles.quilting you find
: difficult to
: : comprehend?
:
:
:
: Please feel free NOT to add snide or whiney comments to
your
: responses to clearly marked OT messages.
:
: If you don't like seeing OT comments in a "quilting
: orum" - and you have constantly made it clear that you
: don't - then don't read them. And if you don't agree
with
: the comments of others either don't reply to them, or at
: least try to remain civil (see definition below).
:
: From M-W Dictionary -
: synonyms CIVIL, POLITE, COURTEOUS, GALLANT, CHIVALROUS
mean
: observant of the forms required by good breeding. CIVIL
: often suggests little more than the avoidance of overt
: rudeness owed the questioner a civil reply. POLITE
: commonly implies polish of speech and manners and
sometimes
: suggests an absence of cordiality if you can't be
pleasant,
: at least be polite. COURTEOUS implies more actively
: considerate or dignified politeness clerks who were
: unfailingly courteous to customers. GALLANT and
CHIVALROUS
: imply courteous attentiveness especially to women.
GALLANT
: suggests spirited and dashing behavior and ornate
: expressions of courtesy a gallant suitor of the old
: school. CHIVALROUS suggests high-minded and
: self-sacrificing behavior a chivalrous display of
duty.
:
: If you are merely amusing yourself by testing how many
: people you can annoy enough for them to snap back -
: congratulations! You have caught me on a bad day. I
have
: snapped back (more from exasperation than anger), and
you
: have goaded me into being as rude to you as you are to
this
: group. Are you happy?
:
:
:
: Message blocking applied in THIS reader too - I should
: have remembered when I updated (sigh)!
:
: But Cheryl, remember we adopted him as our pet troll the
last time he
: started berating us. Remember, egg, gravy etc.
:
: --
: Sally at the Seaside ~~~~~~~~~~ (uk)
: http://community.webshots.com/user/sallyswin



Cats February 23rd 07 12:16 PM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 
" I am eruditerer than you" rofl

But then the UK and Commonwealth countries would have a
laugh over anomalies like Lieutenant

US = loo-ten-ant
UK = lef-ten-ant

--

Cheryl & the Cats in OZ
o o o o
( Y ) ( Y )
Boofhead Donut
http://community.webshots.com/user/witchofthewest
catsatararatATyahooDOTcomDOTau


"Megan Zurawicz" wrote in message
...
: My favorite example of that is "off tin". T in "often"
has been silent how
: many centuries? when these folks decide to be "cultured-er
than thou" and
: studiously enunciate it.......
:
: --pig
:
:
: On 2/23/07 03:59, in article
, "Sally
: Swindells" wrote:
:
: My pet hate is difficult to describe, but is what I call
'false
: gentrification' of the language.
:



Roberta Zollner February 23rd 07 01:08 PM

OT Grammar Book New Log Cabin Quilt
 
Pointing out here that "loo-tenant" is closer to the original French from
which this word comes. :-)
Roberta in D

"CATS" schrieb im Newsbeitrag
...
" I am eruditerer than you" rofl

But then the UK and Commonwealth countries would have a
laugh over anomalies like Lieutenant

US = loo-ten-ant
UK = lef-ten-ant

--

Cheryl & the Cats in OZ
o o o o
( Y ) ( Y )
Boofhead Donut
http://community.webshots.com/user/witchofthewest
catsatararatATyahooDOTcomDOTau


"Megan Zurawicz" wrote in message
...
: My favorite example of that is "off tin". T in "often"
has been silent how
: many centuries? when these folks decide to be "cultured-er
than thou" and
: studiously enunciate it.......
:
: --pig
:
:
: On 2/23/07 03:59, in article
, "Sally
: Swindells" wrote:
:
: My pet hate is difficult to describe, but is what I call
'false
: gentrification' of the language.
:






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